......Our History
88
The Pipe Club of London was
formed in 1970 in association
with the late Pipe Club of Great
Britain with a view to encourage
the appreciation of quality pipes
and fine tobaccos, and, to
promote the interests of
members by offering them social
entertainment and educational
facilities connected with pipes
and tobacco.

The Club is truly international in
scope, having approximately 300
members in twenty-six countries
around the world.

Meetings are held at various
venues in and around the greater
London metropolitan area. Please
click on the Club Calendar tab for
specific venues, dates and times.

All pipe smokers whether novice
or expert, men or ladies are
welcome to attend. Activities
include tobacco tasting, talks on
pipes and tobaccos, pipe-
smoking competitions, visits
to pipe factories--and the
camaraderie of like-minded
pipe smokers. [More
 HERE.]
...............    
Club Officers
2014
   
 Life President
Peter C. Wiseman UK050L
& 1st Lady Bridgette Wiseman
Tel. 01689 607528
pcwpcol@webandmail.co.uk

 Chairman
Bernard Allotey UK372F
Tel. 0795 0605617
ballotey@fsmail.net

 Vice Chairman
Gottfried Panzer UK165L
Tel. 0208 8470983
gottfried@fastmesssage.co.uk

Secretary & Treasurer
John Green UK270L
jdgjohngo@yahoo.co.uk

Public Relations Officer
David Buist UK678F
buistd@yahoo.co.uk

Journal Editor
Laurence Kothari UK439F
laurence.pcol@ntlworld.com
.    .
Committee Members
.for 2014 HERE.
Website design by John Wade Long, Jr. - Yahoo! Web Hosting - © Copyright 2008-2014 Pipe Club of London by John Wade Long, Jr.               GnomeSane Productions
PCoL NOTICES
Upcoming Meetings
20 September - Saturday
Visit to Mike Billington's BLAKEMAR
BRIARS. Website
HERE.  Map HERE.
   
9 September - Tuesday
James J. Fox, est. 1787
19 St. James's Street (A4)
London SW1A 1ES
   
Free counters!
ATTENTION LADS & LASSIES!
PLEASE...
Email your pipe-smoking friends round the globe with an invitation to log onto our PCoL HOME page
so that their national flag will join yours in all its glory!
THANK YOU!
.    
CLICK on the above map to pull up the Flag Counter menu.

CLICK the DETAILS tab, and CLICK the + sign by any flag to see which states or regions have visitors represented.

Viz. Under the UK flag are England, Wales & Scotland.

Fascinating!
.....CLUB MEETINGS
.............2014
...................    

James J. Fox
2nd Tuesday of each month.
Website: www.jjfoxpipes.co.uk
Facebook: HERE
19 St. James's Street
London SW1A 1ES

Time: 6:00 ~ 8:00pm
DIRECTIONS:
Map:
HERE
"Pipe Dreams" HERE
YouTube Channel: HERE

....................    

Thatcher's Arms
..............
3rd Saturday of each month unless
there's an away event planned. Always
check the Club Calendar for details.

Warley Street
Great Warley,
Brentwood
Essex  CM13 3H
U
Tel. 01277 233535

Time: 11:30 am - 12:00 pm start
Click
HERE for a map.

...................    
   
Still, they were a vast improve-
ment
on the 1830 invention of
Charles Sauria. Although they were
odorless and burned more evenly,
this was due to the addition of
highly toxic
white phosphorous
(red is safe). Many
match factory
workers and some match users
were afflicted with
"phossy jaw" -
a hideously deforming gangrenous
necrosis of the jaw. A single packet
of matches contained enough white
phosphorous to kill a person.


Oh what a tangled web we weave!

BACK TO SWEDEN
Lundstrom's highly-touted  safety
match, patented in 1855, solved
both problems. Red phosphorous
was embedded in the sandpaper
outside the box (as today) with the
other ingredients on the match
head.
But, blast 'em, they don't
strike anywhere!
 











THE NOBLE VESTA... a fascinating
story.
[Read more HERE.]
  A FLAMIN' QUIZ

What was the first match called?
1. a Vesta
2. a Lucifer
3. a Congreve
4. a Flaming Fusee
5. a fa chu
6. a Vesuvian

The Englishman John Walker
(1781-1859), English chemist and
apothecary, invented the match in
1857. He had the b
rilliant idea of
coating the end of a stick with
antimony sulfide, potassium
chlorate, gum and starch, and
letting it dry. When striking the
end of the stick on any surface,
VOILA'!, he could start a fire
by striking the stick anywhere.
These friction matches he
named  
"Congreves" - alluding to

Congreve's Rocket (a military
weapon)
invented in 1804.  A
former chemist at 59 High Street,
in Stockton-on-Tees, Walker's first
sale of these matches was on April
7, 1827 to one Mr. Hixon, a local
solicitor. Walker, who made little
money from his invention, died in
1859. He is buried in the Norton
Parish Churchyard in Stockton if
you'd care to visit and light up
your pipe in his honour - with a
match, of course.


BUT WAIT! Sorry. Truth be told,
an ancient Chinese text from 930
by Tao Gu says: "If there occurs an
emergency at night
, it may take
some time to make a light to light
a lamp
, but an ingenious man
devised the system of impreg-
nating little sticks of pinewood
with sulfur and storing them ready
for use. At the slightest touch of
fire they burst into flame. One
gets a little flame like a kernel of  
corn."
Corn? Corn is native to
North America.  [Continued at left.
]
   
   
   
The Noble Vesta
"Vest Pocket Fire Insurance"
Above: Queen Victoria's death vesta 1901-
Webmaster's C
ollection - UK 603H
Special Tobacco on Offer
by Samuel Gawith, Ltd.
Exclusively for the Pipe Club of London
“Aged Limited Edition”
2 Year Old Full Virginia Flake - 50g tin
Click HERE for the fascinating story
of how this special tobacco came to be.
Samuel Gawith & Co Ltd.
Kendal, Cumbria, England LA97BY
enquiries@samuelgawith.co.uk
   
WINNER of the 2014 Radford Cup?
Why, BRIAN OLIVER, of course.
Yes... again! Congratulations, Brian!
Tobacco: Robert Lewis's Orcilla Mixture
   
That confusing bit of information
notwithstanding, in another text dated
1270 by
Wu Lin Chiu Shih, we find that
sulphur matches - known as
fa chu or
tshui erh - were being sold in the
markets of Hangzhou during the time
of Marco Polo's visit. Thus endeth our
English boast.
Drat.









MEANWHILE, BACK IN ENGLAND:
STINKY, DODGY & DOWNRIGHT
D
EADLY MATCHES

    Not that our English matches were
anything to boast about.
 Until the
invention of "saftey matches" by Johan
Lundstrom of Sweden
in 1855, myriad
dangers persisted.

    
Samuel Jones, having seen John  
Walker's "Congreves
," decided to
market them
as "Lucifers." They were
highly
popular with smokers, but,
when struck, had a ghastly odor.
Too,  
t
hese little devils could light off in
one's vest
, or worse, trouser pocket so
that neither
one's breast nor bollocks
were safe
! [Continued at left.]
   
Click to enlarge.